Always looking on bright side bad for health? Back pain linked to weak glutes

Looking on the bright side is BAD for your health as stress helps us cope with bad news better

If you dismiss bad tidings and are over-optimistic instead it might not be the best thing for your health

YOU know the saying – always look on the bright side of life.

Well don’t. It turns out it might not be the best advice after all and could actually be BAD for your health, experts warn.

Feeling stressed can help people cope better with bad news, scientists have discovered.

It adds to increasing evidence that pressure is sometimes a good thing and sheds fresh light on mental health problems like depression.

Most people have a tendency to dismiss bad tidings and instead are over-optimistic.

But some people, such as those with depression, focus more on negative information which can actually help them process bad news better.

The surprising secret to beating back pain

Baby got back pain? It’s time for some booty work.

A strong butt is one of your best defenses against back pain, which affects 80 percent of the population, according to Chris Crowley and Jeremy James, authors of the new book “The Younger Next Year Back Book” (Workman).

Your behind “is the most overlooked aspect of back treatment,” James, a chiropractor in Aspen, Colo., tells The Post. “The big, powerful muscles in your buttocks were designed to help you do really important things, like pick things up or keep you erect while you’re walking. They were not meant to be cushions.”

When we make a habit of lazing about on our derrières, it leads to a phenomenon that Crowley, who co-writes the best-selling “Younger Next Year” book series, calls “gluteal amnesia.” “Your glutes are the big muscle, the biggest support to your back,” he tells The Post. But when they’re routinely under-exercised — or over-sat-on — “your butt goes to sleep. Your glutes turn into drapery.”

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