Canada Bill 89, new law says "take your children away if you disagree with them if they say they're transgender".

The world has gone mad. Completely mad.

The Canadian government may legally remove children from families that refuse to accept their child’s chosen “gender identity” thanks to new legislation passed by the Ontario province.
Bill 89, “Supporting Children, Youth and Families Act, 2017,” was approved on June 1 by a vote of 63 to 23.
The Minister of Children and Youth Services, Michael Coteau, who introduced the bill, said earlier this year that a parent’s failure to recognize and support a child’s gender self-identification is a form of child abuse, and a child in these circumstances should be removed from the situation and placed into protection.
“I would consider that a form of abuse, when a child identifies one way and a caregiver is saying no, you need to do this differently,” Coteau said. “If it’s abuse, and if it’s within the definition, a child can be removed from that environment and placed into protection where the abuse stops.”
The new bill replaces the Child and Family Services Act, or Bill 28, which governed child protection, foster care and adoption services.
While “gender identity” and “gender expression” are included in the new legislation as important factors to be considered in determining “the best interests of the child,” the religious faith in which the parents are raising the child—present in former laws—has been removed from consideration for assessing the child’s best interests.
Child protection agents, adoption service providers and judges are now required to take into account and respect a child’s “race, ancestry, place of origin, color, ethnic origin, citizenship, family diversity, disability, creed, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity and gender expression.”
The former law stated that the parent of a child in care has the right “to direct the child’s education and religious upbringing.” The new law has removed that consideration, saying parents can direct the child’s education and upbringing “in accordance with the child’s or young person’s creed, community identity and cultural identity.”
Some Christians have reacted strongly to the new bill, calling it a violation of parents’ primordial rights to educate their children and a direct assault on Christian beliefs.
“With the passage of Bill 89, we’ve entered an era of totalitarian power by the state, such as never witnessed before in Canada’s history,” said Jack Fonseca, senior political strategist for Campaign Life Coalition. “Make no mistake, Bill 89 is a grave threat to Christians and all people of faith who have children, or who hope to grow their family through adoption.”
Canadian child protection services are no stranger to invasive micromanagement of child-rearing according to a predetermined worldview.
In April of this year, a Christian couple filed a lawsuit against Hamilton Children’s Aid Society after two foster children were removed from their care because they refused tell the children that the Easter bunny is real.
“We have a no-lying policy,” said Derek Baars, one of the foster parents, as the motivation for disobeying a child support worker who ordered him and his wife to tell the two girls in their care, aged 3 and 4, that the Easter bunny is real.
“We explained to the agency that we are not prepared to tell the children a lie. If the children asked, we would not lie to them, but we wouldn’t bring it up ourselves,” Baars said.

www.breitbart.com/big-government/2017/06/06/new-ontario-law-enables-govt-to-seize-children-from-parents-opposing-gender-transition/
www.nowtheendbegins.com/canada-passes-bill-89-allowing-government-seize-children-parents-opposed-gender-transition/



Canada Bill 89:
Supporting Children, Youth and Families Act, 2017
This Explanatory Note was written as a reader’s aid to Bill 89 and does not form part of the law.
Bill 89 has been enacted as Chapter 14 of the Statutes of Ontario, 2017.
EXPLANATORY NOTE
The Bill is divided into four Schedules.
Schedule 1 repeals the Child and Family Services Act and enacts the Child, Youth and Family Services Act, 2017 in its place.
Schedule 2 amends the Child and Family Services Act while it is still in force, that is, before its repeal by Schedule 1.
Schedule 3 amends the new Act, the Child, Youth and Family Services Act, 2017.
Schedule 4 contains related and other amendments to 36 other Acts.
schedule 1
Child, Youth and Family Services Act, 2017
The current Act refers throughout to Indian and native children, and gives certain rights of notice and participation to a representative chosen by the child’s band or native community. The new Act refers to First Nations, Inuit and Métis children and young persons, and gives rights of notice and participation to a representative chosen by each of the child’s or young person’s bands and First Nations, Inuit or Métis communities.  All references to a child’s or young person’s bands and First Nations, Inuit or Métis communities in the new Act include any band of which the child or young person is a member, any band with which the child or young person identifies, any First Nations, Inuit or Métis community that is listed in a regulation and of which the child or young person is a member, and any First Nations, Inuit or Métis community that is listed in a regulation and with which the child or young person identifies.
Significant changes are made to terminology. The terms society ward and Crown ward are no longer used.  Instead, the new Act refers to children who are in interim society care or extended society care, respectively. The new Act does not refer to children being abandoned or to runaways.  And the new Act speaks of bringing children to a place of safety, instead of being apprehended, and of dealing with matters, not dealing with children.
The new Child, Youth and Family Services Act, 2017 is, like the current Child and Family Services Act, divided into Parts.  Following is an explanation of each Part and, in particular, how each differs from the current Act.
Part I Purpose and Interpretation
The paramount purpose of the Act — to promote the best interests, protection and well-being of children — remains unchanged from the current Act.
The additional purposes of the Act are expanded to include the following:
To recognize that services to children and young persons should be provided in a manner that respects regional differences wherever possible and takes into account,
physical, emotional, spiritual, mental and developmental needs and differences among children and young persons;
a child’s or young person’s race, ancestry, place of origin, colour, ethnic origin, citizenship, family diversity, disability, creed, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity and gender expression; and
a child’s or young person’s cultural and linguistic needs.
To recognize that services to children and young persons and their families should be provided in a manner that builds on the strengths of the families wherever possible.
One of the additional purposes in the current Act is to recognize that services to Indian and native children and families should be provided in a manner that recognizes their culture, heritage and traditions, and the concept of the extended family.  This is amended to refer to First Nations, Inuit and Métis children and young persons and families and to their cultures, heritages and traditions and is expanded to also recognize connection to their communities.
There is no longer specific reference to a child’s or young person’s religion in the additional purposes of the Act.  However, a child’s or young person’s creed is listed as one of several factors to be considered throughout the new Act. “Creed” is defined to include religion.
Part II Children’s and Young Persons’ Rights
This consolidates the rights of children and young persons found in section 2 and Parts I and V of the current Act.
New provisions are added as follows: restricting service providers and foster parents from using physical restraint on children and young persons except as authorized by the regulations, and from using mechanical restraints on children and young persons except as permitted by Parts VI (Youth Justice) and VII (Extraordinary Measures) and the regulations.  The provision in the current Act prohibiting service providers from detaining a child in locked premises except as authorized under the Youth Justice and Extraordinary Measures parts of that Act is maintained; it now expressly applies to foster parents as well as service providers and in respect of young persons as well as children.
In addition, a new statement of rights of children and young persons is added at the outset of the Part, including their right to express their own views freely and safely, to be engaged through honest and respectful dialogue, to have their views given due weight in accordance with their age and maturity and to be informed, in language suitable to their understanding, of their rights and of the existence and role of, and how to contact, the Provincial Advocate for Children and Youth. The procedures in the current Act for making complaints against service providers regarding alleged violations of the rights of children also applies under the new Act to complaints regarding limitations or conditions imposed on visitors and visits.  A child or other person may make a complaint as an individual or as part of a group.
Part III Funding and Accountability
This Part replaces Part I of the current Act.  There are several additions as follows.
The Minister may designate entities as lead agencies, which must perform the functions assigned to the lead agency’s category by the regulations.  The Minister may issue binding directives to certain service providers and lead agencies.  A program supervisor may issue compliance orders to certain service providers and lead agencies for failure to comply with, among other things, the Act, the regulations or the directives.
The functions of children’s aid societies are set out in this Part and remain essentially the same.  One change is that societies are now responsible for investigating allegations that a child is in need of protection and for protecting children in their care, for all children up to the age of 18; in the current Act, these responsibilities are limited to children younger than 16 and to 16 and 17 year olds who are subject to protection orders.
This Part now includes a requirement that every society enter into an accountability agreement with the Minister as a condition of receiving funding; this is currently a requirement in the regulations under the Act, and is being made a statutory requirement in the new Act.
The Minister may issue binding directives to societies.  A Director may issue compliance orders to societies for failure to comply with, among other things, the Act, the regulations, an accountability agreement or the directives.
If a society fails to comply with a compliance order, or if the Minister considers it to be in the public interest, the Minister may make a variety of different orders, including ordering a society to take corrective action, suspending, amending or revoking the society’s designation, appointing or replacing members of the society’s board of directors, designating or replacing a chair of the board, or appointing a supervisor to operate and manage the society.  Unless certain conditions exist, the Minister must notify the society of the intention to make such an order, and the society has a right to make a written response.
This Part sets out rules for two or more societies that are proposing to amalgamate and to continue as one society.  The Minister may order that a society amalgamate with one or more other societies, or undertake other types of restructuring, if the Minister considers it to be in the public interest.  The Minister must notify the society of the intention to make such an order and the society has a right to make a written response to the directions contained in the order, but not to the requirement to amalgamate.  In certain circumstances, the Minister may also appoint a supervisor to implement or facilitate the implementation of such an order. A society that receives notice of a proposed order to amalgamate or otherwise restructure must give a copy of the notice to affected employees and their bargaining agents, and on receipt of a final order to amalgamate or otherwise restructure, the society must give notice of the order to affected employees and their bargaining agents and other persons or entities whose contracts are affected by the order, and must make the order available to the public.
The rules for allowing a program supervisor to enter and inspect certain premises to determine compliance with the Act and the regulations are expanded.  This Part now sets out rules for such inspections without and with a warrant.
Provisions governing residential placement advisory committees have been moved from Part II (Voluntary Access to Services) in the current Act to this Part in the new Act with the following changes:  the current Act lists persons to be included in the committees, while the new Act provides that the committees may include the listed persons; the new Act requires the committees to report to the Minister on their activities annually and on request; the right to object to a residential placement and to ask the Child and Family Services Review Board to review a committee’s decision in respect of a residential placement is no longer limited to children 12 or older.
Part IV First Nations, Inuit and Métis Child and Family Services
This Part replaces Part X of the current Act.
Under the current Act, the Minister may designate native communities for the purposes of the Act.  Under this Part, the Minister may make regulations establishing lists of First Nations, Inuit and Métis communities for the purposes of the Act, with the consent of the community’s representatives.
Another change is that, under the current Act, a band or native community may designate a body as an Indian or native child and family service authority.  Under this Part, a band or First Nations, Inuit or Métis community may designate a body as a First Nations, Inuit or Métis child and family service authority.
Part V Child Protection
This Part replaces Part III of the current Act with the following changes.
The age of protection is increased to include 16 and 17 year olds.  Under the new Act, 16 and 17 year olds may be found to be in need of protection and additional circumstances or conditions applicable only to 16 and 17 year olds may be prescribed to make that determination.  However, 16 and 17 year olds may not be brought to a place of safety without their consent.  Societies are newly authorized to enter into agreements with 16 and 17 year olds in need of protection and to bring applications to court.
The matters to be considered in determining the best interests of a child are changed. The child’s views and wishes, given due weight in accordance with the child’s age and maturity, unless they cannot be ascertained, and in the case of a First Nations, Inuk or Métis child, the importance of preserving the child’s cultural identity and connection to community must be taken into consideration.  In addition, any other circumstances that are considered relevant, including a list of 11 circumstances similar to those listed in the current Act, are to be considered. Differences include: the current Act includes the child’s cultural background in this list while the new Act includes the child’s cultural and linguistic heritage; the current Act includes the religious faith in which the child is being raised while the new Act includes the child’s race, ancestry, place of origin, colour, ethnic origin, citizenship, family diversity, disability, creed, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity and gender expression.
The authority for societies to enter into voluntary agreements with persons unable to temporarily care for their children and with young persons is moved from Part II (Voluntary Access to Services) of the current Act to Part V of the new Act.  Temporary care agreements may be entered into with respect to children of any age and are no longer restricted to children younger than 16.  The authority to enter into special needs agreements is not included in the new Act.
Under the current Act, persons older than 18 may receive extended care and maintenance from a society if they were subject to a custody order or Crown wardship order that expired on their turning 18 or marrying, if they were eligible to receive support services as a 16 or 17 year old, whether or not they actually received those services or, in the case of Indian or native persons, if they were cared for under customary care immediately before their 18th birthday.  The comparable section under the new Act makes the provision of continued care and support mandatory in the circumstances listed in the current Act, adds an additional circumstance when it is to be provided , i.e., when a person entered into an agreement with the society as a 16 or 17 year old and the agreement expires on the person’s 18th birthday, and uses the updated terminology of First Nations, Inuit and Métis people and of children who are in extended society care.
Societies are required to make all reasonable efforts to pursue a plan for customary care for a First Nations, Inuk or Métis child if the child is in need of protection, cannot remain in the care of or be returned to the person who had charge of the child immediately before intervention by the society or the person entitled to custody of the child and is a member of or identifies with a band or a First Nations, Inuit or Métis community.  Customary care is defined as the care and supervision of a First Nations, Inuk or Métis child by a person who is not the child’s parent, according to the custom of the child’s band or First Nations, Inuit or Métis community.
An equivalent to section 86 of the current Act, which prohibits Roman Catholic children from being placed in the care of a Protestant society, institution or family and Protestant children from being placed with a Roman Catholic society, institution or family, is not included in the new Act.  Instead, a society is to choose a residential placement that, where possible, respects the child’s race, ancestry, place of origin, colour, ethnic origin, citizenship, family diversity, creed, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression and cultural and linguistic heritage.  In the case of a First Nations, Inuk or Métis child, priority is to be given to placing the child with a First Nations, Inuit or Métis family, respectively.
The duty that all persons have to report suspicions that a child is in need of protection applies only in respect of children younger than 16.  However, a person may make a report in respect of a child who is 16 or 17.
Part VI Youth Justice
This Part incorporates Part IV of the current Act with the following changes.
This Part adds that a person in charge of a place of open custody, of secure custody or of temporary detention may authorize certain types of searches in accordance with the regulations, and provides that any contraband found during a search may be seized and disposed of in accordance with the regulations.
This Part also places limits on the use of mechanical restraints in places of secure custody or of secure temporary detention.
Part VII Extraordinary Measures
This Part replaces Part VI of the current Act, with the following changes.
A section is added setting out limits on the use of mechanical restraints in secure treatment programs.
The current Act allows children and young persons to be placed in secure isolation rooms; in the new Act, this is changed to allow for placing children and young persons in secure de-escalation rooms.
Under the current Act, service providers are required to comply with standards prescribed by regulation respecting the period of time a young person 16 or older who is in a place of secure custody or secure temporary detention may spend in a secure isolation room and regarding the observation of the young person. In the new Act, the time periods and observation standards for those young persons who are placed in secure de-escalation rooms are set out in the Act itself.
Part VIII Adoption and Adoption Licensing
This Part builds on Part VII of the current Act.
The matters to be considered in determining the best interests of a child are changed.  The changes are the same as those described above under Part V Child Protection.
A new two stage process is added for a licensee to bring a child who is not a resident of Canada into Ontario to be placed for adoption.  First, the licensee must obtain a Director’s approval of the person with whom the child is to be placed as eligible and suitable to adopt based on a homestudy.  Second, the licensee must obtain a Director’s approval of the proposed placement.
The current Act provides an exception to certain requirements if a child is placed for adoption with the child’s relative, the child’s parent or a spouse of the child’s parent.  In the new Act, the exception is limited to circumstances in which the child is a resident of Canada and the placement is within Ontario.  The current Act also provides an exception to the same requirements if a child is sent out of Ontario for adoption by the child’s relative, the child’s parent or a spouse of the child’s parent.  In the new Act, the exception is now limited to circumstances in which the placement is within Canada.
There is a new requirement on societies that begin planning for the adoption of a First Nations, Inuk or Métis child to consider the importance of developing or maintaining the child’s connection to the child’s bands and First Nations, Inuit or Métis communities.
The ability of a court to make an openness order in respect of a child for the purposes of facilitating communication or maintaining a relationship between the child and certain persons remains.  A new type of openness order is added where a society intends to place a First Nations, Inuk or Métis child who is in extended society care for adoption.  In such circumstances, the child, the society, or a representative chosen by each of the child’s bands and First Nations, Inuit or Métis communities may apply for an openness order.  The court may make this type of openness order if it is satisfied that the order is in the child’s best interests, that the order would help the child to develop or maintain a connection with the child’s First Nations, Inuit or Métis cultures, heritages and traditions and to preserve the child’s cultural identity and connection to community and, if the child is 12 or older, if the child consents.
In the various provisions regarding applications for and proceedings with respect  to openness orders, the method of giving notice to a child requires that notice must be given to the Children’s Lawyer, the child’s lawyer, if any, and the child if the child is 12 or older.  The child is entitled to participate in the proceeding as if they were a party.
There is a new requirement on societies to make all reasonable efforts to assist a child to maintain relationships with persons that are beneficial and meaningful to the child where the child was placed for adoption but the society decides not to finalize the adoption or where a child returns to the care of a society after an adoption order was made.
The adoption licensing rules that were in Part IX of the old Act are now in this Part and remain substantially the same.
Part IX Residential Licensing
This Part replaces Part IX of the current Act.  Current Part IX addresses both residential licensing and adoption licensing.  Under the new Act, adoption licensing has been moved into Part VIII.
As under the current Act, a licence is required to operate a children’s residence or to provide residential care in specified circumstances.  This Part now provides for regulations to prescribe any other residence as a children’s residence.
Other additions to this Part include the following.  The Minister may issue binding directives to licensees.  The Minister may publish certain information with respect to licences and applications for licences.  Licences are to be issued or renewed for a specified term.  A Director may assign a class to a licence.  On issuing or renewing a licence, a Director may include the maximum number of children for whom residential care may be provided by the licensee.  A licensee must charge the amount set out in or determined in accordance with the regulations for the provision of residential care, unless the regulations exempt the licensee.
The rules respecting the right to request a hearing by the Licence Appeal Tribunal, and to appeal the Tribunal’s findings, remain essentially unchanged.
The powers of a program supervisor to conduct residential licensing inspections under the current Act are replaced by powers of an inspector to conduct such inspections for the purposes of determining compliance with the Act, the regulations and the directives.  This Part now sets out rules for such inspections without and with a warrant.
Part X Personal Information
This Part replaces the very limited Part VIII in the current Act, and is essentially a new Part.  It is modelled on provisions in the Personal Health Information Protection Act, 2004.
This Part sets out extensive rules for the following:  the collection, use and disclosure of personal information by the Minister and by service providers; the determination of whether an individual has the capacity to give, withhold or withdraw consent to the collection, use or disclosure of their personal information; the authorization of a substitute decision-maker to give, withhold or withdraw consent on behalf of an individual; the maintenance and protection of personal information by service providers; individuals’ rights of access to service providers’ records containing their personal information and to require service providers to correct that information; individuals’ rights to make a complaint to the Information and Privacy Commissioner in respect of any contraventions of this Part; the Information and Privacy Commissioner’s powers and duties under this Part.
Part XI Miscellaneous Matters
This Part incorporates Part XII of the current Act with the following changes.
New in this Part is the authority of the Lieutenant Governor in Council to require, by regulation, certain persons, including those who provide or receive services under the Act, to provide police record checks to another person or body.  Also, a society may, in the prescribed circumstances or for a prescribed purpose, ask the police for police record checks or other prescribed information.
Under the current Act, the Minister must periodically conduct a review of the Act or of those provisions specified by the Minister; the review must include a review of provisions imposing obligations on societies when providing services to an Indian or native person. In Part XI of the new Act, the review must address the following matters: the rights of children and young persons; the provisions imposing obligations on societies when providing services to a First Nations, Inuk or Métis person; and the additional purpose of the Act related to First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples, with a view to evaluating the progress that has been made to achieve that purpose.  It also requires the Minister to consult with children and young persons when conducting a review.
Part XII Regulations
As in the current Act, the power to make regulations for each Part of the Act is set out in its own section.  In addition, section 339 authorizes the Lieutenant Governor in Council and the Minister to make regulations for the purposes of the Act as a whole, including regulations to govern transitional matters that may arise from the enactment of the new Act and the repeal of the current Act.
schedule 2
Amendments to the child and family services act
This Schedule amends the current Child and Family ServicesAct as follows.
It anticipates the increase in the age of protection from 16 to 18 that is in the new Act in Schedule 1 in the following amendments:  clauses 15 (3) (a) and (b) of the Act are re-enacted so that societies’ functions to investigate allegations that a child may be in need of protection and to protect children in their care are no longer restricted to children younger than 16 or already subject to a protection order; section 27 of the Act is amended to specify that a service provider requires a court order or the consent of a person who is 16 or older before providing the person with a service; subsection 29 (2) of the Act is re-enacted to allow temporary care agreements to be entered into in respect of children who are 16 or older; the definition of “child” in subsection 37 (1) of the Act, which excludes children who are apparently or actually 16 or older for the purposes of Part III (Child Protection), is repealed, so that child in Part III means a person younger than 18; subsection 37 (2) of the Act is amended to provide that regulations may be made setting out additional circumstances or conditions under which a 16 or 17 year old may be found to be in need of protection; section 40 is amended and new sections 40.1 and 46.1 provide that a society may bring a 16 or 17 year old who is subject to a supervision order to a place of safety only with their consent and the society must, as soon as possible and at the latest within five days of bringing the 16 or 17 year old to a place of safety, bring the matter to court or return the child to the person entitled to custody.
New section 37.1 authorizes 16 and 17 year olds to enter into agreements with societies for the provision of services and supports to them where the society determines that they are or may be in need of protection and is satisfied that no less disruptive course of action is available and the child wants to enter into the agreement.
Section 57 of the Act is amended to provide that a court shall make no order under that section in respect of a child who withdrew from parental control before or after intervention under Part III, where the court is not satisfied that a court order is necessary to protect the child in the future even though the child is found to be in need of protection.
Section 71.1 of the Act is amended to allow a person 18 or older to receive care and maintenance from a society if the person entered into an agreement for services from the society as a 16 or 17 year old and that agreement expired on the person’s 18th birthday.
The duty under section 72 to report suspicions that a child is in need of protection is amended to allow, though not require, such reports in respect of children who are 16 or 17.
All the amendments discussed above anticipate provisions in the new Act.  However, these amendments to the current Act are intended to come into force before the new Act does.
schedule 3
Amendments to the Child, Youth and Family Services Act, 2017
This Schedule amends the new Child, Youth and Family Services Act, 2017 as follows.
Sections 133 and 134 of the Act, which provide for the maintenance of a child abuse register, are repealed.  Consequential amendments are made to other sections to delete all references to sections 133 and 134.
Subsection 206 (1) of the Act allows a court to change an adopted person’s surname or given name.  This is re-enacted to permit the court to change an adopted person’s surname, forename, both surname and forename or single name.  The court may also change the person’s single name to a name with at least one forename and surname or the person’s forename and surname to a single name.  Single names are to be determined in accordance with the traditional culture of the adopted person or the applicant or applicants.
References to the Corporations Act are replaced with references to the as yet unproclaimed Not-for-Profit Corporations Act, 2010.
schedule 4
Amendments to other Acts
This Schedule contains amendments to 36 other Acts, most of which are consequential to the repeal of the Child and Family Services Act and the enactment of the Child, Youth and Family Services Act, 2017.  Most of these amendments simply update references to the current Act and terminology from the current Act to refer to the new Act and the new terminology.
A few Acts are amended more extensively as follows.
The Intercountry Adoption Act, 1998 is amended to bring that Act into closer alliance with the adoption and adoption licensing requirements of the Child, Youth and Family Services Act, 2017.  In particular, amendments are made to require police record checks, to give the Director under that Act additional authority to refuse to issue or renew or to revoke a licence to facilitate intercountry adoptions, to clarify the inspection powers with respect to licensees and to amend the penalty provisions.
The Jewish Family and Child Service of Metropolitan Toronto Act, 1980 is amended to provide that the society established under that Act is deemed to be a children’s aid society designated under the Child, Youth and Family Services Act, 2017 and that it may only exercise its powers to bring children to a place of safety within the City of Toronto.  The governance provisions in the special Act are repealed, leaving the society subject to the governance provisions in the Child, Youth and Family Services Act, 2017.
The Public Sector Labour Relations Transition Act, 1997 is amended to apply automatically upon the amalgamation of two or more children’s aid societies.
The only amendments in this Schedule that are unrelated to the repeal of the Child and Family Services Act and the enactment of the Child, Youth and Family Services Act, 2017 are to the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act.  Subsections 65 (8) and 67 (2) of that Act are amended to correct references to other Acts.
 
Bill 89                                                                                                                                                    2017
An Act to enact the Child, Youth and Family Services Act, 2017,
to amend and repeal the Child and Family Services Act
and to make related amendments to other Acts
CONTENTS

1. Contents of this Act
2. Commencement
3. Short title
Schedule 1 Child, Youth and Family Services Act, 2017
Schedule 2 Amendments to the Child and Family Services Act
Schedule 3 Amendments to the Child, Youth and Family Services Act, 2017
Schedule 4 Amendments to Other Acts

 
Her Majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the Legislative Assembly of the Province of Ontario, enacts as follows:
Contents of this Act
1 This Act consists of this section, sections 2 and 3 and the Schedules to this Act.
Commencement
2 (1)  Subject to subsections (2) and (3), this Act comes into force on the day it receives Royal Assent.
(2)  The Schedules to this Act come into force as provided in each Schedule.
(3)  If a Schedule to this Act provides that any provisions are to come into force on a day to be named by proclamation of the Lieutenant Governor, a proclamation may apply to one or more of those provisions, and proclamations may be issued at different times with respect to any of those provisions.
Short title
3 The short title of this Act is the Supporting Children, Youth and Families Act, 2017.

www.ontla.on.ca/web/bills/bills_detail.do?locale=en&BillID=4479&isCurrent=false&ParlSessionID=412&detailPage=bills_detail_the_bill
 
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