Coronavirus could blight world for decade… Italian Doc fears ‘new contagion’ as country eases… Chilling video of mass grave in Iran sparks higher toll fears…

Coronavirus could blight world for decade…

Coronavirus will return as a seasonal virus like the flu, scientists have said as fears grow the deadly disease could blight the world for a decade.

A group of Chinese viral and medical researchers told reporters in Beijing on Monday that the virus will likely not disappear like SARS did because it can infect asymptomatic carriers.

This means that people can spread the virus without experiencing its symptoms like a fever and cough, making it difficult to track its spread.

Jin Qi, director of the Institute of Pathogen Biology at the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, said: “This is very likely to be an epidemic that co-exists with humans for a long time, becomes seasonal and is sustained within human bodies.”

 

 

Italian Doc Fears ‘New Contagion’ As Country Eases…

PHILADELPHIA (CBS) — As governors in the United States formulate plans to reopen their state’s economies, hard-hit Italy is also slowly lifting its lockdown. But fears of a second surge are very real.

Italy, in its entirety, has been on lockdown since March 9, and in northern regions, earlier than that, as the country was harrowed by the earliest surge of COVID-19 cases outside of China.

Chilling video of mass grave in Iran sparks higher toll fears…

Harrowing scenes of families mourning at a mass coronavirus cemetery in Iran have emerged amid fears that the coronavirus death toll in the country has been underreported.

Footage taken at Tehran’s Behesht-e Zahra cemetery shows rows of empty chambers under the ground, which appear to be the new section built for coronavirus victims.

As the camera pans, grieving families can be seen paying tributes to the loved ones who passed away.

One man is seen standing on the empty plots as he looks out to the chilling horizon.

The Behesht-e Zahra cemetery is Iran’s largest graveyard which can house up to 1.6 million bodies.