Here’s how the US has reached 200,000 COVID deaths…

CDC director agrees hospitals have monetary incentive to inflate COVID-19 data

U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Director Robert Redfield acknowledged during a House hearing Friday that COVID-19 data could be inflated because hospitals receive a monetary gain by reporting COVID-19 cases.

Republican Rep. Blaine Luetkemeyer of Missouri questioned Redfield during a House Oversight and Reform subcommittee hearing on coronavirus containment. He asked about the “perverse incentive” for hospitals to classify deaths as being coronavirus related when the virus didn’t cause the death.

Luetkemeyer voiced concern about how an automobile accident-related death could be recorded as a COVID-related death. In this scenario, the death was recorded as COVID-related because the virus was in the victim’s system, even if the car accident was the major factor.

“As long as you have COVID in your system you get to claim it as a COVID death, which means you get more money as attending physician, hospital, whatever,” Luetkemeyer said during the hearing. “Would you like to comment on that, about the perverse incentive? Is there an effort to try and do something different.”

Redfield responded by telling the congressman, “I think you’re correct in that and we’ve seen this in other disease processes too.”

“In the HIV epidemic, somebody may have a heart attack but also have HIV,” Redfield explained. “The hospital would prefer the DRG [death report] for HIV because there’s greater reimbursement. So I do think there is some reality to that.”

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Redfield said that death reporting comes down to what a physician thinks and how he or she classifies a death in a death certificate. He also said the National Center for Health Statistics reviews “all those death certificates.”

“I think it is less operable in the cause of death although I won’t say there are not some cases,” he said. “I do think, though, when it comes to hospital reimbursement issues for individuals that get discharged, there could be some play in that for sure.”

Luetkemeyer previously posed a similar question to Adm. Brett Giroir, Department of Health and Human Services assistant secretary for health, in a July 2 hearing. However, the discussion was halted due to time constraints.

In the July 2 hearing, the legislator also asked about the discrepancy in COVID-19 reporting that saw an automobile death recorded as a COVID-19 death.

MORE:

www.christianpost.com/news/cdc-director-agrees-that-hospitals-have-monetary-incentive-to-inflate-covid-19-data.html

Now…

Below is a breakdown of how much money each state receives from the Feds per COVID case. As you can see, they’re greatly incentivized to inflate the numbers as much as they can to receive as much money as possible.

Alabama
$158,000 per COVID-19 case

Alaska
$306,000

Arizona
$23,000

Arkansas
$285,000

California
$145,000

Colorado
$58,000

Connecticut
$38,000

Delaware
$127,000

District of Columbia
$56,000

Florida
$132,000

Georgia
$73,000

Hawaii
$301,000

Idaho
$100,000

Illinois
$73,000

Indiana
$105,000

Iowa
$235,000

Kansas
$291,000

Kentucky
$297,000

Louisiana
$26,000

Maine
$260,000

Maryland
$120,000

Massachusetts
$44,000

Michigan
$44,000

Minnesota
$380,000

Mississippi
$166,000

Missouri
$175,000

Montana
$315,000

Nebraska
$379,000

Nevada
$98,000

New Hampshire
$201,000

New Jersey
$18,000

New Mexico
$171,000

New York
$12,000

North Carolina
$252,000

North Dakota
$339,000

Ohio
$180,000

Oklahoma
$291,000

Oregon
$220,000

Pennsylvania
$68,000

Rhode Island
$52,000

South Carolina
$186,000

South Dakota
$241,000

Tennessee
$166,000

Texas
$184,000

Utah
$94,000

Vermont
$87,000

Virginia
$201,000

Washington
$58,000

West Virginia
$471,000

Wisconsin
$163,000

Wyoming
$278,000

SOURCE:

www.beckershospitalreview.com/finance/state-by-state-breakdown-of-federal-aid-per-covid-19-case.html

 

 

h/t STAX