Theresa May demands Jeremy Corbyn be 'open and transparent' over claims he was named in a foreign spy files and gave information to a Czech

  • May today said every MP had to be ‘accountable’ for the actions in their career 

  • Intervention came after Czech ex-spy Jan Sarkocy made lurid new allegations   

  • Labour figures pocketed between £1,000 and £10,000 a meeting, Sarkocy said 

 

Theresa May today demanded Jeremy Corbyn be ‘open and transparent’ in response to allegations he and other Labour MPs met with Soviet-backed spies 30 years ago.

The Prime Minister said each MP had to be accountable for their actions when claims were levelled against them.

Labour has furiously denied the claims levelled against Mr Corbyn and other senior MPs since his name was found on archive files held by the Czech civil service.

Ex-spy Jan Sarkocy has made a series of lurid allegations since the records first emerged publicly last week.

Labour sources have insisted Sarkocy has no credibility and nothing to back up his incendiary claims, branding them ‘absurd’ and a ’tissue of lies’.

Despite the denials Tory MPs have called for a full inquiry by the Foreign Affairs Select Committee into the allegations made.

 
www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5409273/May-demands-Corbyn-open-transparent-spy-claim.html
Seatbelts on my fellow Brits.
 
High Treason

Under the law of the United Kingdomhigh treason is the crime of disloyalty to the Crown. Offences constituting high treason include plotting the murder of the sovereign; committing adultery with the sovereign’s consort, with the sovereign’s eldest unmarried daughter, or with the wife of the heir to the throne; levying war against the sovereign and adhering to the sovereign’s enemies, giving them aid or comfort; and attempting to undermine the lawfully established line of succession. Several other crimes have historically been categorised as high treason, including counterfeiting money and being a Catholic priest.[1]
High treason was formerly distinguished from petty treason, a treason committed against a subject of the sovereign, the scope of which was limited by statute to the murder of a legal superior. Petty treason comprised the murder of a master by his servant, of a husband by his wife, or of a bishop. Petty treason ceased to be a distinct offence from murder in 1828, and consequently high treason is today often referred to simply as treason.
Considered to be the most serious of offences, high treason was often met with extraordinary punishment, because it threatened the safety of the state. Hanging, drawing and quartering was the usual punishment until the 19th century. The last treason trial was that of William Joyce, “Lord Haw-Haw“, who was executed by hanging in 1946.
Since the Crime and Disorder Act 1998 became law, the maximum sentence for treason in the UK has been life imprisonment.[2]

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High_treason_in_the_United_Kingdom
 
h/t Billy 

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