Violent August in NYC: Shootings double, murder up 50%…

Violent August in NYC: Shootings Double, Murder Up 50%…

The steep rise in gun violence that has rattled New York City and intensified the debate over policing continued at an alarming rate in August, as shootings more than doubled over the same period last year and murders rose by nearly 50 percent, the police said.

The data released on Wednesday reflected a trend many cities across the country are experiencing in a year already marked by a pandemic and civil unrest: a new surge in shootings, murders and other crimes that has public officials grasping for explanations and scrambling to respond.

The uptick has been seized upon by President Trump, who has tried to shift the public’s attention away from his response to the pandemic to what he depicts is out-of-control crime in New York City and other urban areas. He has tried to blame the rise in violence on local Democratic leaders.

Violent crime always rises in the summer, but this year has been extreme in New York. Since May, the city has recorded 791 shootings, a more than 140 percent increase over the same period in 2019. The 180 murders seen between May and August is a more than 51 percent increase compared to 2019.

In August alone, there were 242 shootings in the city, compared with 91 last year. The number of murders rose from 36 to 53.

 

Urinating woman seen ‘performing sex act’ on Manhattan street…

  • A woman was seen performing a sex act on a man in public on Sunday night 

  • The disturbing incident took place between W 78th and 79th St and Broadway

  • It comes as the Upper West Side continues to grapple with a rise in homelessness and crime amid the pandemic 

  • A witness who took the photo told DailyMail.com said the ‘vile’ act has become the ‘norm’ in the area 

  • Residents have complained about a spike in crime and violence after officials began housing 13,000 homeless people in luxury hotels in the area 

  • Many wealthy residents fled the city as the coronavirus pandemic took hold and have not returned; others are leaving in a second wave of departures