Congress gives $4 million to combat climate-change with weather-modification via aerosols

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by Dr. Eowyn

The media portray Americans who believe in chemtrails and weather-modification as tinfoil hat-wearing “conspiracy theorists,” as if there are no real conspiracies and ignoring the inconvenient fact that it was the CIA who concocted the label “conspiracy theory” for the express purpose of discrediting by denigrating skeptics of the official version of the Kennedy assassination.

But the plain fact is that the U.S. government has been engaged in weather modification (“tinkering with the environment”) since 1953, as revealed in a 784-page U.S. Senate report, Weather Modification: Programs, Problems, Policy, and Potential (U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington: May 1978), which came to light in April 2017, nearly 40 years after it was published.

See “Not a conspiracy theory: U.S. government has engaged in weather modification since 1953

Now, there is more evidence of the U.S. government’s weather modification.

Chemtrails over Barcelona, Spain

John Fialka reports for E&E News (via ScienceMag.org), Jan. 23, 2020, that David Fahey, the top climate-change scientist at the federal government’s National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), said his agency has received $4 million (which Fahey said could expand to more than $100 million) from Congress to combat climate change with “geoengineering” — which he calls “Plan B”.

But Fahey wants the nomenclature be changed from “geoengineering” to “climate intervention,” which he maintains is a “more neutral” term. He says:

“Geoengineering is this tangled ball of issues and science is only one of them. One of the things I’m interested in doing is let’s separate the science out.”

Fahey is a physicist and the director of the Chemical Sciences Division of NOAA’s Earth System Research Laboratory.

Fahey said “Plan B” refers to two emergency—and controversial—methods to cool the Earth if the U.S. and other nations fail to reduce global greenhouse gas emissions:

  1. Inject sulfur dioxide or a similar aerosol into the stratosphere to help shade the Earth from more intense sunlight, just as volcanic eruptions cool the Earth by emitting huge clouds of sulfur dioxide.
  2. Use an aerosol of sea salt particles to improve the ability of low-lying clouds over the ocean to act as shade. This technique is borrowed from “ship tracks”—long clouds left by the passage of ocean freighters that are seen by satellites as reflective pathways.

Fahey said research in both techniques are recommended in a forthcoming study by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine titled “Climate Intervention Strategies that Reflect Sunlight to Cool Earth.”

Even if Plan B were implemented, the results likely would not be immediate. Fahey said Plan B might take until the next century to complete the cooling.

Asked by a researcher whether injections of sulfur dioxide into the atmosphere might reduce seafood by acidifying the oceans, Fahey admitted there would be drawbacks to Plan B, as well as unintended consequences:

“When you put aerosols up into the atmosphere, it does a lot of things. That opens up this whole menu of things that you’d have to worry about. [Other aerosols such as calcite or titania] might have less impact, but nobody knows. We want to look at them in the laboratory. We have to use atmospheric observations to find out what we’re doing.”

Several smaller countries have complained that the use of aircraft to inject aerosols into the atmosphere might alter the weather or destroy the ozone layer that protects humans from some of the more harmful radiation from sunlight.

See “Italians Take First Place in Global March Against Chemtrails

For now, NOAA’s authority does not extend into the stratosphere — the second major layer of Earth’s atmosphere, just above the troposphere, and below the mesosphere. But there is a bill in Congress, HR 5519: Climate Intervention Research Act, that would broaden NOAA’s jurisdiction.

Until now, the closest thing to testing Plan B is a Harvard University-sponsored project called the “Stratospheric Controlled Perturbation Experiment” (SCoPEx). It proposes a small-scale test using a propeller-driven balloon that would ascend to a height of 12 miles over New Mexico and then release less than 2.2 pounds of calcium carbonate. The idea is to create a tubular area in the sky—about six-tenths of a mile long and 109 yards in diameter—through which the sensor-packed balloon could slowly move back and forth, mixing the air and monitoring the solar-reflecting abilities of the scattered materials. It also would track the impact of the treated area on the surrounding atmosphere. When SCoPEx would happen remains unknown.

Fahey said NOAA supports the Harvard stratospheric test and has contributed an instrument to help it measure the dispersion of particles:

“We’re going to have to give up some things to go into Plan B. That’s why we would be motivated to try designer aerosols, but we may not have time. That’s what Harvard wants to do. It goes back to the question of which path you want to be on [–an  international decision to reduce greenhouse gas emissions or being late and forced to implement a Plan B to stop runaway climate change]. I don’t want to be on the late path, but the question is which paths are going to be open to us. I think nobody can play out all the chess moves on this issue. It is so complicated.”

H/t Activist Post

~Eowyn

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