Elizabeth Warren says she wants to eliminate the Electoral College so that California can pick every US President

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via foxnews:

Democratic presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren said she supports eliminating the U.S. Electoral College during a town hall broadcast on Monday night.

“Every vote matters and the way we can make that happen is that we can have national voting, and that means get rid of the Electoral College,” Warren told an audience at the historically black college Jackson State University in Mississippi.

Warren’s statement on CNN came after an audience member asked the Massachusetts senator about voting rights and so-called voter suppression laws.

ELIZABETH WARREN INSISTS HER CAREER WASN’T ADVANCED BECAUSE OF NATIVE AMERICAN HERITAGE CLAIM

“I believe we need a constitutional amendment that protects the right to vote for every American citizen and makes sure that vote gets counted,” she said. “We need to put some federal muscle behind that, and we need to repeal every one of the voter suppression laws that is out there.”

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DON’T KNOW MUCH ABOUT HISTORY: No, the Electoral College Is Not a ‘Shadow of Slavery’s Power.’

Compromises were made in America’s early years because North and South couldn’t agree on whether to continue the institution. Just as obviously, virtually all Americans today wish that slavery had never existed. It’s a part of America’s heritage that is clearly at odds with America’s founding principles.

That does not mean, however, that the Constitution and its presidential election process are simply a “relic of slavery.” The discussions at the Constitutional Convention were shaped more by the delegates’ study of history and political philosophy, as well as their own experiences with Parliament and the state legislatures. They wanted to avoid the mistakes that had been made in other governments. They sought to establish a better constitution that would stand the test of time.

George Washington expressed this conviction, felt so strongly by the founding generation: “[T]he preservation of the sacred fire of liberty, and the destiny of the Republican model of government,” he concluded, “are justly considered as deeply, perhaps as finally staked, on the experiment entrusted to the hands of the American people.”

His words echoed an argument that James Madison had made about a year and a half earlier. Only a republic, Madison had written, “would be reconcilable with the genius of the people of America; with the fundamental principles of the revolution; or with that honorable determination which animates every votary of freedom to rest all our political experiments on the capacity of mankind for self-government.” He thought the experiment worthwhile. The Constitution met these criteria.

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