GOODWIN: Left needs to face reality, Trump is winning… CROWLEY: He keeps confounding his detractors

The Left needs to face reality: Trump is winning

To understand the madness gripping American leftists, try to see the world through their eyes. Presto, you’re now part of the raging resistance.

Like the Palestinians who mark Israel’s birth as their nakba, or tragedy, you regard Donald Trump’s 2016 victory as a catastrophe. It’s the last thing you think of most nights, and the first thing most mornings.

You can’t shake it or escape it. Whatever you watch, listen to or read, there are reminders — Donald Trump really is president.

You actually believe the New York Times is too nice to him, so you understand why a Manhattan woman urged a reporter there to stop covering Trump to protest his presidency.

And where the hell is Robert Mueller? He was supposed to save us from this nightmare — that’s what Chuck Schumer banked on. Well?

You spend your tax cut even as you rail against the man who made it happen. And you are pleased that cousin Jimmy finally got a job, though you repeat the daily devotional that Barack Obama deserves credit for the roaring economy.

And now this — Justice Anthony Kennedy is retiring, and Trump gets another Supreme Court pick. The court might tilt right for the rest of your life. He’s winning.

Trump just keeps on confounding his hapless detractors

The left, much of the media and countless other opponents of President Trump have led a relentless, vicious, multi-pronged and often dishonest assault on him and his agenda since he first emerged as a presidential candidate in 2015. This assault, ramped up significantly during his presidency, has taken many forms: an apparently endless special counsel investigation, constant protests, bureaucratic stonewalling, “Deep State” leaking, continuous lawsuits, manufactured crises and outrage, daily media pounding and often false reporting, smears, personal attacks and abusive, even violent acts targeting his staff and supporters — all designed to cripple his ability to govern effectively.

While Trump’s adversaries have been busy trying to execute their rolling putsch, however, the American people have been busy doing something else: supporting him and his policies. Instead of denting Trump, the perpetual outrage machine is creating the exact opposite dynamic.

The proof is in a stunning new Harvard CAPS/Harris poll just released and conducted after the family-separation issue exploded along the U.S.-Mexico border. Trump now enjoys 47 percent job approval, up 2 points from May. This is remarkable given the constant drumbeat of negative coverage, and it demonstrates yet again his uncanny ability to defy the laws of political gravity. When President Reagan and his policies remained popular in the face of never-ending criticism, he became known as the “Teflon president.” Trump is Teflon on steroids.

Much of his strength is tied to the public’s views on the economy. According to the poll, 69 percent say the economy is “strong,” 58 percent approve of his efforts on job creation, and 57 percent approve of his overall handling of the economy. Perhaps most significantly heading into the 2018 midterm elections, a whopping 68 percent say that their personal economic situation is improving or holding steady. Clearly, voters are experiencing tangible economic benefits as a result of the Trump tax cuts and aggressive deregulation, putting the lie to the Democrats’ sky-will-fall warnings. Given that kitchen-table issues largely drive midterm balloting and Democrats lack a compelling economic message to counter the Trump/GOP successes, Republican candidates are likely to enjoy a significant lift.

POLL: APRROVAL 48%…

The Rasmussen Reports daily Presidential Tracking Poll for Monday shows that 48% of Likely U.S. Voters approve of President Trump’s job performance. Fifty-one percent (51%) disapprove.

The latest figures include 35% who Strongly Approve of the way Trump is performing and 40% who Strongly Disapprove. This gives him a Presidential Approval Index rating of -5. (See trends).

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