How Will Trumpcare Affect Healthcare?

By Gabrielle Seunagal

 

On Thursday, Americans were shocked to learn of the House of Representatives’ approval of the American Health Care Act (AHCA), more commonly referred to as ‘Trumpcare.’ Now, the Senate must make their ruling, but if the bill passes, critical changes to healthcare as we know it will be enacted. For starters, rates for pre-existing conditions will increase,  consumer taxes will be eliminated, and Americans will no longer be forced by the government to purchase health insurance. Despite the alarming unpopularity of the AHCA (even among conservatives), Republican leaders in Washington remained determined to stand by the bill and propel it.

 

Left wing press has made their displeasure with the new rates for pre-existing conditions abundantly clear. A writer for the New York Times censured conservatives who advocate for lower insurance rates. She fails to realize that no American should be forced to foot the bill for someone else’s healthcare under any circumstances. Whenever the government has the power to mandate that citizens purchase any kind of plan, they have overstepped their bounds. People with pre-existing conditions are responsible for budgeting wisely and covering their own healthcare costs. The people of this nation work hard for their money and do not deserve to have it snatched away because of another individual’s issues.

Another colossal flaw within the structure of Obamacare resides in the form of excessive consumer taxes. Under the (Un)Affordable Care Act, Americans were subjected to prescription drug taxes, medical device taxes, and taxes on indoor tanning services. Obamacare also penalized higher income Americans by afflicting them with dividends, capital gains, and an excessive interest income tax. The failure of the (Un)Affordable Care Act serves as tribute to the fact that taxing affluent Americans out of existence will never work.

Trumpcare will undoubtedly prove as a more preferable alternative for healthcare than the (Un)Affordable Care Act. Raising taxes and mandations on hard working Americans was the wrong initiative from the start and engendered massive failure. At the end of the day, each person should assume responsibility for funding their own healthcare and Americans with pre-existing conditions should take that matter into account when budgeting. Nobody should be obligated to foot the bill for someone else’s healthcare.