States probe APPLE for potential consumer protection violation… New iPhones could have superzoom ‘spy camera’ that can see for miles

States probe APPLE for potential consumer protection violation…

APPLE is planning to load future iPhone cameras with high-powered zoom capabilities, according to one insider.

The “periscope” telephoto cameras will allegedly feature in the 2022 iPhone lineup, and could raise serious security concerns.

Analyst Ming-chi Kuo, who has a strong track record in leaking secret Apple plans, predicted iPhone camera changes in a letter to investors this week.

He claimed Apple was in cahoots with two major camera-lens makers to bolster the snappers on iPhones starting this year.

One, South Korean firm Semco, is expected to produce “periscope” lenses for Apple’s iPhone lineup in 2022.

Periscope lenses use mirrors stashed inside a phone to focus light onto the sensor, and have been loaded into mobiles such as the Xiaomi Mi 10 Pro.

New iPhones could have superzoom ‘spy camera’ that can see for miles

  • Texas is among a group of states whose attorneys general are probing Apple over a potential consumer protection law violation, according to a document obtained by the Tech Transparency Project through an open records request.
  • The document, first reported by Axios, says Texas’ attorney general office “anticipates litigation in this matter.”
  • The document does not detail the scope of the investigation, and the Texas Deceptive Practices Act covers a wide range of potential harms.

 

Texas is among a group of states whose attorneys general are probing Apple over potential violations of a consumer protection law, according to a document obtained by the Tech Transparency Project through an open records request and shared with CNBC.

The document, sent in March and first reported by Axios, states that the Consumer Protection Division of Texas’ attorney general office “is involved in a multistate investigation into Apple for potential violations of the Texas Deceptive Trade Practices Act.” It says the investigation was started “for enforcement purposes” and the office “anticipates litigation in this matter.”