The Electron is Not So Simple Anymore

by Natura Naturans

Einstein wrote: ”to understand electron means to understand Physics“.

Maxwell-Dirac Theory and Occam’s Razor: Unified Field, Elementary Particles, and Nuclear Interactions

1) Does exist a a scalar field that is the four divergence of the four electromagnetic potential
2) Charge density is the partial time derivative of the scalar field
3) Current density vector components are the partial space derivatives of the scalar field
4) D’Alembert equation can be applied to both scalar field and charge density
5) Electron mass is the angular frequency of a rotating elementary charge along a circumference which length is equal to Compton wavelength
6) Electron charge follows an elicoidal motion that can be encoded with a single spinor of Cl(3,1).
7)The concept of relativistic mass is easily derived from the electron charge elicoidal motion.
8) The electron charge is distributed on the surface of a sphere that follows a circular or elicoidal motion.
9)The value of the elementary charge is equal (in natural units) to the square root of the radius of this sphere with the radius of the charge orbit
10) The electron spin 1/2 is the quantized component along an external magnetic field of electron angular momentum (=hbar)
11) The elementary charge e is always associate to a quantized magnetic flux phi=h/e
12) The electron charge has a pure electromagnetic momentum eA equal to its mass in natural units
13) Newton law F=ma can be easily explained inside the theory framework
14) The charge moves at speed of light
15) Heisenberg uncertainty principle has a simple geometric interpretation
16) Ultradense hydrogen (and consequently AHE and LENR experiments) may be explained with the formations of pseudo-neutrons where the proton is at center of electron Zitterbewegung charge orbit
17) The electron model suggests a pure electromagnetic-geometric interpretationof Proca, Klein-Gordon, Dirac and Aharonov-Bohm equations

www.amazon.com/Maxwell-Dirac-The…529420927/

e-catworld.com/2019/07/04/e-cat-…d-electon/

Do not think for a minute that I understand this. BUT it gives you an idea that the world is a far more complex place than we thought.

Back in Feynman’s day all they had to worry about was whether an electron was a wave or a particle, now it seems the electron is FAR more complicated. At least Feynman knew he didn’t have the final word:

“Electrons, when they were first discovered, behaved exactly like particles or bullets, very simply. Further research showed, from electron diffraction experiments for example, that they behaved like waves. As time went on there was a growing confusion about how these things really behaved —- waves or particles, particles or waves? Everything looked like both.

This growing confusion was resolved in 1925 or 1926 with the advent of the correct equations for quantum mechanics. Now we know how the electrons and light behave. But what can I call it? If I say they behave like particles I give the wrong impression; also if I say they behave like waves. They behave in their own inimitable way, which technically could be called a quantum mechanical way. They behave in a way that is like nothing that you have seen before. Your experience with things that you have seen before is incomplete. The behavior of things on a very tiny scale is simply different. An atom does not behave like a weight hanging on a spring and oscillating. Nor does it behave like a miniature representation of the solar system with little planets going around in orbits. Nor does it appear to be somewhat like a cloud or fog of some sort surrounding the nucleus. It behaves like nothing you have seen before.

www.goodreads.com/quotes/3215228…-particles

I do believe since matter and energy are just electromagnetic waves that everything is frequency, amplitude, and location. BUT it gets very complicated after that. Think of fields within fields, countless nested fields, all different in size, frequency and amplitude. And don’t forget time. It is impossible to imagine how complicated a human is.

 

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