VOTE IN DEMOCRATS, GET SQUALOR

● New York’s economic outlook ranked worst in the nation.

● Report: Minneapolis Forcing Riot-Wrecked Businesses To Pay Property Taxes Before Getting Permits To Rebuild.

● Not So Magnificent. Chicago’s safest neighborhoods start sharing in the Windy City’s crime outbreak.

● The Truth About San Francisco.

Earlier: “What is so sad about what’s happened to New York is that everybody knew it would happen. This was all predictable, if you remember what happened to New York back in the 1970s and ’80s.”

UPDATE: Austin City Council just voted to cut $150 million from its police department.

Americans Are Fed Up – 72% Are Concerned with Violence in Major Cities – 62% Say It Affects Their Vote

TRENDING: It Begins: Black Lives Matter Mob Demands White People Move Out of Homes and Leave Them for Black People (VIDEO)

Voters are ready for the police to put an end to the continuing violent protests nationwide. Most also say the protests will be important to their vote in the upcoming elections.

When asked which is closer to their own thinking, 50% of Likely U.S. Voters say the police should crack down on the protests to bring them to an end. A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 38% disagree and believe the protests should be allowed to continue until the protesters decide to end them. Eleven percent (11%) are undecided. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

There’s sharp partisan disagreement on this question, though. While 75% of Republicans and a plurality (47%) of unaffiliated voters think the police should crack down on the protests, just 31% of Democrats agree. Fifty-six percent (56%) of Democrats say the protests should be permitted to continue until the protesters want to end them.

Rasmussen continues:

Seventy-two percent (72%) of all voters say they are concerned about the growing level of violent protest nationwide, with 43% who are Very Concerned.

Sixty-two percent (62%) say the growing level of violent protest is important to their vote in the next election, including 35% who say it is a Very important voting issue.

 

 

h/t Ed