California Student Rant At Anti-Communism Display Shows Other Side of Untold Story

by Thinker

We are all entitled to have an opinions, and our Creator says we shouldn’t judge, but I do think its important to know the history of a country or organization before you start volunteering for them. This story shows the reader that they should dig deeper into the truth and see if the rant being heard is something we all should really know. Is she telling the truth?

California Student Goes OFF THE RAILS At Anti-Communism Display

Conservative students at a California university had their anti-socialism display vandalized, according to photos and videos obtained Monday. Santa Clara University’s Turning Point USA chapter set up a table Thursday, as well as 1,000 flags representing 20th-century victims of socialism and communism, according to media and comment obtained by The Daily Caller News Foundation. The group had one of its fliers smacked, flags ripped out of the ground, and a table almost toppled.

“The day started off going well, with lots of engagement and civil discussions with people from all political backgrounds,” Santa Clara Turning Point Vice President Spencer McLaughlin told TheDCNF. A female student became “hostile” at the group’s booth, he claimed:

(VIDEO)
www.conservativedailynews.com/20…lay-video/

Well, the students sitting behind the table were not of color, and probably have never been or experienced what they are promoting. What does any American really know about the history of Cuba, or Puerto Rico? What is happening in Puerto Rico right now? Move the people out and corporate power and wealth in, the pattern that keeps repeating itself with every war and weather disaster. Who continues to profit from these events? The history of the two countries that the girl in the video is ranting about will give one all the answers they ever wanted to know.

The United Fruit Company was an American corporation that traded in tropical fruit (primarily bananas), grown on Central and South American plantations, and sold in the United States and Europe. The company was formed in 1899, It flourished in the early and mid-20th century, and it came to control vast territories and transportation networks in Central America, the Caribbean coast of Colombia, Ecuador, and the West Indies. Though it competed with the Standard Fruit Company (later Dole Food Company) for dominance in the international banana trade, it maintained a virtual monopoly in certain regions, some of which came to be called banana republics, such as Costa Rica, Honduras, and Guatemala.

United Fruit had a deep and long-lasting impact on the economic and political development of several Latin American countries. Critics often accused it of exploitative neocolonialism, and described it as the archetypal example of the influence of a multinational corporation on the internal politics of the banana republics. After a period of financial decline, United Fruit was merged with Eli M. Black’s AMK in 1970, to become the United Brands Company. In 1984, Carl Lindner, Jr. transformed United Brands into the present-day Chiquita Brands International.

The United Fruit Company was[when?] frequently accused of bribing government officials in exchange for preferential treatment, exploiting its workers, paying little by way of taxes to the governments of the countries where it operated, and working ruthlessly to consolidate monopolies. Latin American journalists sometimes referred to the company as el pulpo (“the octopus”), and leftist parties in Central and South America encouraged the company’s workers to strike.

John Foster Dulles, who represented United Fruit while he was a law partner at Sullivan & Cromwell – he negotiated that crucial United Fruit deal with Guatemalan officials in the 1930s – was Secretary of State under Eisenhower; his brother Allen, who did legal work for the company and sat on its board of directors, was head of the CIA under Eisenhower; Henry Cabot Lodge, who was America’s ambassador to the UN, was a large owner of United Fruit stock; Ed Whitman, the United Fruit PR man, was married to Ann Whitman, Dwight Eisenhower’s personal secretary. You could not see these connections until you could – and then you could not stop seeing them.

The secret societies that John F. Kennedy was aware who fought for greed, property, and power. The refugees become the burden to the nations they are dropped off in and the people who have to support them. Take the time to look at the nations from which these refugees come from and you will find that development is full speed ahead. Who is paying to transport these people? What ships bring them in? Who takes their children? From bananas to babies? Admiral Dewey, Admiral Schley, Admiral Sampson and Admiral Farragut (1899) were United States Navy vessels declared surplus after the Spanish–American War. Each carried 53 passengers and 35,000 bunches of bananas. What are solders really fighting for?
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_Fruit_Company