Canadian Prime Minister Bans All AR-15 Rifles-Immediately

by DCG

In the latest “NEVER LET A CRISIS GO TO WASTE” denial of civil rights, Canada’s prime minister Justin Trudeau yesterday (April 30) banned virtually ALL AR-15 rifles the country. Trudeau opted to immediately ban the firearms outright himself, which Canada’s current draconian gun laws allow, rather ordering a “gun buyback,” which would have to first be approved by Canada’s parliament. He did say that he would allow AR-15 owners to have two years to comply with orders to turn in their property. He also said that he would seek legislation at some later date on providing owners with some payment for their guns.

There is no grandfather provision in the new law. The ban is total. It prohibits buying, selling,trading, importing, exporting, exporting, OR USING, any military-grade assault weapons, anywhere in Canada.

Trudeau’s full announcement can be viewed at the following URL:

The announcement begins at 1:48

Trudeau has made no secret of his antipathy toward firearms. He announced his intention to ban AR-15 firearms in March, but delayed because of the Wuhan virus pandemic. In yesterday’s announcement, he indicated that banning AR-15s was just one more step toward even tighter restrictions on firearm ownership. I would not doubt but that his final goal is total disarmament of Canada’s civilian population. Such an event would leave Canada a socialist police state with no unalienable civil rights.

Already Canada has imposed fines and prison sentences for Christian preachers who teach from the pulpit that homosexuality is a sin, or that marriage is only a union between a man and a woman. Canada has strict anti “hate speech” laws.

Unlike the United States Bill of Rights, which was part of our Constitution from the beginning, the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms did not become part of Canada’s constitution until 1982. According to a Canadian governmental fact sheet, “The Constitution is the supreme law of Canada; all other laws must be consistent with the rules set out in it. If they are not, they may not be valid. Since the Charter is part of the Constitution, it is the most important law we have in Canada.

However, the rights and freedoms in the Charter are not absolute. They can be limited to protect other rights or important national values. For example, freedom of expression may be limited by laws against hate propaganda or child pornography. Section 1 of the Charter says that Charter rights can be limited by law so long as those limits can be shown to be reasonable in a free and democratic society.”

Canada is fast becoming a democracy in name only.