CHINA Refuses To Accept North Korean Coal Shipments – Opts To Take US Coal Instead.

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by Pamela Williams
 
When President Trump said he made a deal with China, it seems he did. It is a good deal for US coal miners! President Trump said he wanted to help the coal miners get back to work, and he has made just a deal that will do that. North Korean coal shipments have been turned away at Chinese ports, and some are sitting abandoned.

China has placed massive orders for the steel-making commodity from U.S. producers.  This is amazingly good news for the United States.  It seems President Trump’s time with China’s President was well spent, and Trump is delivering his promise to bring back jobs to the US.
China is North Korea’s bread and butter, largest source of trade, and aid.  This rejection of North Korean coal is meant to deprive Pyongyang of important source of foreign currency.
Surely North Korea is in shock and should be rethinking it present day threats to the United States.
This is a big deal, as buying US coal marks a major change in China’s direction.  No US coal was exported to China between late 2014 and 2016.  In February, coal shipments from the US to China was estimated to be more than 400,000 tons.
www.foxnews.com/politics/2017/04/11/china-rejects-north-korean-coal-shipments-opts-for-us-supplies-instead.html
I just found an update to this news article.
Senior North Korean Envoy Visits Beijing After China Coal Ban!
North Korea’s main ally said it would ban coal imports about a week after North Korea tested an intermediate-range ballistic missile, for the first time since US President Donald Trump took office.
As we Americans know Barack Obama did nothing to deter North Korea’s aggression  toward the United States.  He seemed to think if he ignored it, it would just go away.  In fact, it has gotten progressively worse. Now North Korea and the United States is at a boiling point, and President Trump has asked for China’s help.
“The visit of the North Korean vice foreign minister is normal diplomatic contact and exchange between China and North Korea,” foreign ministry spokesman Geng Shuang said.
North Korea has said to China it was “dancing to the tune” of the United States for halting coal imports over the North’s nuclear and missile programs.
In a Reuters interview, President Trump said he welcomed China’s ban, Beijing could solve the challenge posed by the North “very easily if they want to,” turning up pressure on China to do more.
Chine later said the crux of the matter was a dispute between Washington and Pyongyang.  
This was originally reported by REUTERS.  
Source:
www.todayonline.com/world/senior-north-korea-envoy-visits-beijing-after-china-coal-ban
 

See also  China moves to place task forces of warships to Alaska and Hawaii

Published on Feb 18, 2017
 
China will suspend all imports of coal from North Korea starting Feb. 19, the country’s commerce ministry said in a notice posted on its website on Saturday, as part of its efforts to implement United Nations sanctions against the country.
 
The Ministry of Commerce said in a short statement that the ban would be effective until Dec. 31.
 
The ministry did not say why all shipments would be suspended, but South Korea’s Yonhap news agency reported last week that a shipment of North Korean coal worth around $1 million was rejected at Wenzhou port on China’s eastern coast.
 
The rejection came a day after Pyongyang’s test of an intermediate-range ballistic missile, its first direct challenge to the international community since U.S. President Donald Trump took office on Jan. 20.
 
China announced in April last year that it would ban North Korean coal imports in order to comply with sanctions imposed by the United Nations and aimed at starving the country of funds for its nuclear and ballistic missile programs.
 
But it made exceptions for deliveries intended for “the people’s wellbeing” and not connected to the nuclear or missile programs.
 
Despite the restrictions, North Korea remained China’s fourth biggest supplier of coal last year, with non-lignite imports reaching 22.48 million tonnes, up 14.5 percent compared to 2015.
 

14 thoughts on “CHINA Refuses To Accept North Korean Coal Shipments – Opts To Take US Coal Instead.

  1. So, Obama “did nothing” hoping the problem would just go away? Really? So Who was behind getting the UN to impose sanctions on N.Korea? Bushjr./Trump? I think one look at Syria and N.Korea’s “aggression(?)” towards US makes sense. Iraq, Syria, Yemen, most of South America, South Pacific Islands (atom bomb test) et al. Can’t imagine what N.Korea is worried about.
    This article, and others like it really are trying too hard to give Trump way too much credit. The Business that are benefiting, already exist. And great more coal mining, great! Yawn.

  2. Mark my words, It may take awhile, but the us will turn even china against russia just like they turned the entire european union

  3. This article is false. It is combining old news with new events and is deceptive. China had issued a ban on North Korean coal imports in April 2016, but later exploited a loophole to let it import $858 million worth and later in December 2016, Beijing exceeded the monthly U.N.-imposed cap on North Korea’s exports
    The cap restricted Pyongyang from exporting coal amounting to more than one million metric tons or worth $53.5 million for that month — whichever was lower. For its part, Beijing imported more than double the allowed amount and more than triple the value.

      • Two million tons are stranded at Chinese ports; the agency reported quoting a source at Dandong Chengtai, one of China’s biggest buyers of North Korean coal.
        To reduced the shortfall in coal imports, China resumed buying American coal this year. According to trade data, China bought over 400,000 tons by late February. The US did not export coking coal to China between late 2014 and 2016. However, President Donald Trump pledged to revive the country’s coal sector.
        US Secretary of State Rex Tillerson warned that following the missile strike again Syria, North Korea could be the next. Beijing and Washington have reportedly agreed to impose tougher sanctions against Pyongyang if it carries out nuclear or long-range missile tests.
        President Trump tweeted on Tuesday that a trade deal between China and the US depends on how Beijing tackles North Korea.

    • You are false. Two million tons are stranded at Chinese ports; the agency reported quoting a source at Dandong Chengtai, one of China’s biggest buyers of North Korean coal.
      To reduced the shortfall in coal imports, China resumed buying American coal this year. According to trade data, China bought over 400,000 tons by late February. The US did not export coking coal to China between late 2014 and 2016. However, President Donald Trump pledged to revive the country’s coal sector.
      US Secretary of State Rex Tillerson warned that following the missile strike again Syria, North Korea could be the next. Beijing and Washington have reportedly agreed to impose tougher sanctions against Pyongyang if it carries out nuclear or long-range missile tests.
      President Trump tweeted on Tuesday that a trade deal between China and the US depends on how Beijing tackles North Korea.

  4. Trump reportedly pressured Xi to crack down on North Korea, according to Newsmax. On Sunday, U.S. Secretary of State and Rex Tillerson told “Face the Nation” that China had begun to understand that the situation with North Korea “has intensified and has reached a certain level of threat that action has to be taken.”
    Besides further isolating the already isolated regime of North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un, China’s ban on North Korean coal has another upside for the United States. It appears that the ban, which is expected to last until the end of the year, has increased China’s trading with the U.S.
    “To make up for the shortfall from North Korea, China has ramped up imports from the United States in an unexpected boon for U.S. President Donald Trump, who has declared he wants to revive his country’s struggling coal sector,” Reuters reported, citing its trading analysis software Eikon.
    “Eikon data shows no U.S. coking coal was exported to China between late 2014 and 2016, but shipments soared to over 400,000 tonnes by late February,” Reuters reported.

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