Florida House Passes Gun Control Bill.

by Ruby Henley
The Florida House has passed a school safety bill that includes new restrictions on rifle sales and a program to arm some teachers.   I see it as a double edged sword – some good news and some questionable. However, the bottom line is this is just the beginning on the degrading of the Second Amendment.  How far will it go? I do see some positive measures which will take place if the Bill passes the desk of Governor Rick Scott.
Scott has vowed to review the Bill “line by line” before signing it.  “The group that I am going to be talking to – the groups that I care most about right now – because it impacted them so much – is the families,” Scott said.
Personally I believe it is a done deal.  What is in the Bill?
1) Raise the minimum age –
The bill would change the minimum age for all gun purchases to 21 from 18.  I have one problem with this. If one is old enough to enter the military at age 18, then he or she should be able to buy a gun at that age.  Those in the military should be exempt from this.
 
2)Add a three-day waiting period –
Prospective gun buyers would have to wait three days, or until a background check is completed, whichever is longer. There would be some exceptions, including for police officers, members of the military, licensed hunters, and licensed concealed carriers. Since technology delivers background checks almost immediately and the exclusion involves a wide range of gun enthusiasts, critics claim this doesn’t add much value to the bill.  Personally I see no problem with this. I hate to say this, but the only hesitation I have with this is a person, who is a victim of domestic violence, might end up dead due to this wait period. However, on the whole – it makes sense.
 
3)Ban bump stocks –
The banning of bump stocks after the Vegas shooting stalled when an Illinois ban failed to pass. Bump stocks are devices that can be attached to rifles to enable them to fire faster, turning a semi-automatic weapon into one that fires like an illegal automatic weapon. After Nevada massacre, the N.R.A. said it supported a national ban on bump stocks.  I see no problem with this. Who needs a bump stock?
 
4)Arm school employees –
A provision in the bill would allow superintendents and sheriffs to arm school personnel, deputizing the use of the firearm to defend against attacks in these gun-free zones.  The bill would create a $67 million voluntary “marshal” program under which certain employees, including counselors, coaches and librarians, but not full-time classroom teachers, could be trained and armed.  This is a really positive step, but I do not think full-time classroom teachers should be exempt. Why should they have to be exempt, except for the fact it would not be a good measure to have a firearm in a classroom?  I am sure that is the reason.
 
5)Fund school security –
The bill allocates millions of dollars to make buildings more secure and to hire more school-based police officers. Some critics are questioning the move since there was one armed resource officer, Scot Peterson, on the grounds but did not enter the building.  This is questionable, as the fact they are going to arm school personnel makes this unnecessary. Is this going to be a type of money-making scheme for government? Will funds really go to “caring for the children” or filling the pockets of politicians?
 
6)Expand mental health services and gun ownership restraining orders –
Florida school districts would receive state funding to provide mental health care to students and allow the police to temporarily confiscate guns from anyone subject to involuntary psychiatric evaluation under Florida’s Baker Act. It would also prohibit gun sales to Floridians who were committed to mental institutions or deemed mentally incompetent by a judge, and would allow the police, with judicial approval, to bar a person deemed dangerous from owning guns for up to a year.)   THIS IS SLIPPERY SLOPE, which could prove to be truly an act against WE THE PEOPLE. Who can trust those who have the power to label certain people as mentally incompetent to truly have their best interests at heart. This is not an aspect of this Bill we can trust. I am against it.
 
In the below video, you will see a father of one of the victim’s in the alleged Florida school shooting explain he lost his daughter, and he will never stop trying to change the law on gun ownership.  I see this as just the beginning, as we will see assault on the Second Amendment slowly creep in culminating in trouble for WE THE PEOPLE – a battle for our Second Amendment Right.